Vermont: Page 4

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“First American Platform Scale”

Found on State Route 2 heading into St. Johnsbury, Vermont

“After experimenting with new types of farm equipment, plows, and stoves, Thaddeus Fairbanks invented the platform scale here in 1830.  With his brothers Erastus and Joseph, he founded the company which still bears their name.  Many St. Johnsbury public institutions were gifts of this talented family.”

Picture of VT Road Marker First American Platform Scale St. Johnsbury, Vermont

“First American Platform Scale”

“St. Johnsbury Trade School”

Found on State Route 2 heading into St. Johnsbury, Vermont

Inscription: “Vermont’s first and for many years only four year vocational school opened on Western Avenue on September 3, 1918.  Needing skilled workers during World War I, Fairbanks, Morse & Co. started an all-day co-operative school where young men could learn a skilled trade, earn money and obtain a high-school education.  The original building, known as the Casino, was partially remodeled in 1919 and completely remodeled in 1927.  The first out-of-town students arrived for vocational training in 1927.  The “new” Trade School Building, built in 1942 on the site of Sir Thaddeus Fairbanks’ estate, is currently the St. Johnsbury Middle School.”

“Principals of the Vocational/Trade School:  Stanley J. Steward (1918 – 1923), G. Maynard Trafton (1923 – 1941), Everett Winslow (1941 – 1942), G. Maynard Trafton (1942 – 1946) and Lewis J. Streeter (1946 – 1970)”

Picture of VT Road Marker St. Johnsbury Trade School St Johnsbury, Vermont

“St. Johnsbury Trade School”

Picture of VT St Johnsbury Trade School

St. Johnsbury Trade School

“Thaddeus Stevens”

Found on State Route 2 on the Common in Danville, Vermont

Inscription: “Born crippled and poor in Danville in 1792.  Stevens was schooled by his mother, Sally Morrill Stevens, and at nearby Caledonia County Grammar School, graduating from Dartmouth College in 1814.  He became a brilliant lawyer committed to racial equality.  As an abolitionist Congressman from his adopted state of Pennsylvania and as Chair of the House Ways & Means Committee, he worked to finance the Civil War.  He was recognized as the father of the14th and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution and architect of the Reconstruction of the South.  He was both renown and reviled for his eloquent call for the abolition of slavery.”

Picture of VT Road Marker Thaddeus Stevens Danville, Vermont

“Thaddeus Stevens”

“Henry M. Leland: Designer of Cadillac and Lincoln Automobiles”

Found on State Rout 16 (Glover Road) in Barton, Vermont

Inscription: “Born in Barton on February 16, 1843 to a hard working farm family, Henry Leland carried into his life the strength and quality of his family’s work ethic adding to it his gift and love for precision.  By 1890, Leland was in Detroit where he had become chief engineer at Cadillac.  Know as one of the world’s foremost automobile engineers, he won the Dewar Trophy twice: in 1909 for the concept of interchangeable parts and in 1914, with C.F. Kettering, for the automobile self-starter.  At 74, he formed the Lincoln Motor Company to build aircraft engines for use in World War I.  In 1919 he developed the the [sic] Lincoln Automobile.  Henry Leland died March 26, 1932.”

Picture of VT Road Marker Henry M Leland Barton, Vermont

“Henry M. Leland”

“Bayley-Hazen Military Road”

Found on State Route 5 just north of junction with State Route 302 in the village of Wells River in the town of Newbury, Vermont

Inscription: “At this point began the so called Hazen road, running northerly 54 miles to Hazen’s Notch in Westfield. Recommended to General Washington by General Jacob Bayley, built by General Bayley, as far as Cabot in 1776, completed by General Moses Hazen 1779.  Now re-christened the Bayley-Hazen military road. Erected by the town in 1912.”

Picture of Bayley-Hazen Military Road Stone Marker in Newbury, Vermont

“Bayley-Hazen Military Road”

“Colonel Thomas Johnson”

Found on State Route 5 north of the village of Newbury in the town of Newbury, Vermont

Inscription: “One of the first settlers of Newbury, 1762. Influential in organizing the town and state; revolutionary officer; aid to General Lincoln at Ticonderoga, 1777. A prisoner in Canada 1781, elected Representative ten times. This marks the location of the town, erected by his descendants under the auspices of Oxbow Chapter D.A.R.”

Picture of Colonel Thomas Johnson Stone Marker in Newbury, Vermont

“Colonel Thomas Johnson”

“Log Meeting House 1762-1912”

Found on State Route 5 north of the village of Newbury in the town of Newbury, Vermont

Inscription: “Here stood the log meeting house of the early settlers. The first meeting house in this section, the second in the state; later used for the first public school in this part of New England. Erected by the Oxbow Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution.”

Picture of Log Meeting House Stone Marker in Newbury, Vermont

“Log Meeting House”

“Old Court House”

 Found on State Route 5 north of the village of Newbury in the town of Newbury, Vermont

Inscription: “Here stood from 1773 to 1801 the old court house with jail connected for Gloucester County New York, which became Orange County Vermont. It was used for a meeting house until 1788. The Legislature of 1787 met in this building. A few rods northerly stood the log fort of revolutionary days. Erected by the town August 1912.”

Picture of Old Court House Stone Marker in Newbury, Vermont

“Old Court House”

“Jeremiah Ingles”

 Found on State Route 5 north of the village of Newbury in the town of Newbury, Vermont

Inscription: “Newbury’s grand ‘old meeting house’ stood on this site from 1788 to 1848. For twenty years Jeremiah Ingles served as its choirmaster. His revolutionary tunebook ‘The Christian Harmony’ (1805) preserved spirituals, folk-hymns, and fuging tunes such as ‘Northfield’ and ‘New Jerusalem’ beloved by three centuries of shape-note singers. ‘Fly swift around ye wheels of time and bring the promise day'”

Picture of Jeremiah Ingalls Stone Marker in Newbury, Vermont

“Jeremiah Ingalls”

“Jacob Bayley: Founder of Newbury and Revolutionary General”

Found on State Route 5 north in the village of Newbury in the town of Newbury, Vermont

Inscription: “Veteran of the Indian Wars, Bayley led a migration of settlers from Newbury, Mass. to the rich lands of the Coos here at the great Ox-Bow. A staunch patriot, he bitterly opposed the ‘Haldimand Negotiations’ carried on with Canada by Ethan & Ira Allen, during the revolution.”

Picture of VT Road Marker Jacob Bayley Newbury

“Jacob Bayley”

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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