New Hampshire: Page 1

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“Haverhill-Bath Bridge”

Found at the junction of State Route 302 and State Route 135 in the village of Woodsville in Haverhill, New Hampshire

Inscription: Constructed in 1829 by the towns of Bath and Haverhill at a cost of about $2,400, this is one of the oldest covered bridges in the United States. Built with 3-by-10-inch planks that were probably sawn at an adjacent mill, the span is the earliest surviving example of the lattice bridge truss that was patented in 1820 by Connecticut architect Ithiel Town (1784-1844). The bridge was strengthened with laminated wooden arches in 1921-22, and the upstream sidewalk was added at about the same time. The 256-foot-bridge carried traffic for 170 years before being bypassed in 1999.

Picture of Road Marker Haverhill Bath Covered Bridge

“Haverhill-Bath Bridge”

Picture of Haverhill Bath Covered Bridge

Haverhill Bath Covered Bridge

“Rogers Rangers”

Found on State Route 10 south of the village of Woodsville and north of the village of North Haverhill in Haverhill, New Hampshire

Inscription: The rivers’ junction two miles north was rendezvous for Rogers Rangers after their destruction of St. Francis, Que., Oct. 4 1759.  Pursuing Indians and starvation had plagued their retreat and more tragedy awaited here.  The expected rescue party bringing food had come and gone.  Many Rangers perished and early settlers found their bones along these intervales.

NH Road Marker Rogers Rangers Haverhill_Woodsville

“Rogers Rangers”

“Ebenezer Mackintosh: 1737 – 1816”

Found on State Route 10 north of the village of North Haverhill in Haverhill, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Born in Boston and a veteran of the 1758 Battle of Ticonderoga.  As a known participant in the Boston Tea Party, for his own and his children’s safety, he walked to North Haverhill in early 1774.  He later served in the Northern Army under Gen. Gates in 1777.  He was a shoemaker by trade and practiced his vocation here for the rest of his life.  He is buried nearby in Horse Meadow Cemetery.”

NH Road Marker Ebenezer Mackintosh Haverhill_North Haverhill

“Ebenezer Mackintosh”

“Haverhill Corner Historic District: National Register of Historic Places, 1987; Town of Haverhill Granted, 1763”

Found on State Route 10 in the village of Haverhill Corner in Haverhill, New Hampshire

Inscription: “‘The Corner’ was part of a mile-wide strip of land claimed by both Haverhill and Piermont, and finally divided between them.  Haverhill Corner’s architecture reflects its history as Grafton County seat (1793-1891), home of Haverhill Academy (founded 1794), and northern end of the first Province Road from the coast (later the Coos Turnpike, now Court Street).  Col. Charles Johnston settled here in 1769 and promoted village growth.  His house and Gov. John Page’s still stand, with other notable dwellings, taverns, church, library and school buildings.”

NH Road Marker Haverhill Corner Historic District in Haverhill

“Haverhill Corner Historic District”

“Bath Bridge”

Found at the junction of State Route 302/10 State Route 112 in Bath, New Hampshire (Kancamagus Highway)

Inscription: “Erected in 1928, this riveted steel Warren truss span was built to replace a wooded span destroyed in the 1927 flood.  This efficient truss design is based on a series of equilateral triangles with verticals added for strength.  Boston Bridge Works fabricated the structure in Elmira, NY.  Reflecting recent improvements in steel technology, the bridge incorporates rolled I-beams that minimized shop time and eased assembly in the field.  This standard plan was also used in Bethlehem Hollow.”

NH Road Marker Bath Bridge

“Bath Bridge”

Picture of Bath Bridge in Bath, New Hampshire

Bath Bridge in Bath, New Hampshire

“Bath, New Hampshire”

Found on State Route 302/10 south of the Bath Village in Bath, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Settled in 1766 by Jaasiel Harriman whose cabin was near the Great Rock.  His nine year old daughter Mercy carried dirt in her apron to the top of this unique rock formation.  Here she planted corn, pumpkins and cucumbers, making the first garden in town.  Three well-preserved covered bridges are to be found here.  Among its many fine homes is the Federal mansion build by Moses P. Payson in 1810.”

NH Road Marker Bath

“Bath, New Hampshire”

“First Ski School in America”

Found at the junction of State Route 117 and Lovers Lane in Sugar Hill, New Hampshire

Inscription: “In 1929, on the slopes of the hill to the east, Austrian-born Sig Buchmayr established the first organized ski school in the United States.  Sponsored by Peckett’s-on-Sugar Hill, one of the earliest resorts to promote the joys of winter vacationing in the snow, the school provided an initial impetus to the ski sport America knows today.”

NH Road Marker First Ski School Sugar Hill

“First Ski School in America”

“Wildwood”

Found on State Route 112 (Kancamagus Highway) and Hummingbird Lane (just past the junction for State Route 116 to Franconia heading to Lincoln)

Inscription: “In this are of Easton (formerly part of Landaff and before that, Lincoln), the settlement of Wildwood once stood.  At the turn of the 20th century Wildwood was a center for the ‘slash and run’ loggingn of Mt. Moosilauke.  The Village included a school, a post office, several sawmills, a boardinghouse and a few homes.  West of here was a dam used in the spring drives that moved logs down the Wild Ammonoosuc River, from the mountains to southern New England mills.  The last log drive on the river occurred in 1911.  From 1933 to 1937, the first CCC camp authorized in NH was located at Wildwood.”

NH Road Marker Wildwood Kancamagus

“Wildwood”

“Stone Iron Furnace”

Found on State Route 116/18 in Franconia, New Hampshire just before the junction with State Route 117

Inscription: “Due west stands New Hampshire’s sole-surviving example of a post-Revolutionary furnace for smelting local iron ore.  The industry flourished during the first half of the 19th century.  It produced pig and bar iron for farm tools and cast iron ware, including famous ‘Franconia Stoves'”

NH Road Marker Stone Iron Furnace Franconia

“Stone Iron Furnace”

Stone Iron Furnace in Franconia, New Hampshire

Stone Iron Furnace in Franconia, New Hampshire

“Old Coal Kiln”

Found on State Route 302 north of Lisbon, New Hampshire and south of Littleton, New Hampshire

Inscription: “A reminder of bygone days, this stone structure was used to make wood into charcoal for the nearby iron smelters.  Pine knots, a waste material from the adjacent lumber mill, were a prime source for charcoal.  Charcoal production through this kiln, built in the 1860’s, was necessary to the iron mining industry.”

NH Road Marker Old Coal Kiln Littleton

“Old Coal Kiln”

Picture of Old Coal Kiln in Littleton, New Hampshire

Old Coal Kiln in Littleton, New Hampshire

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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