New Hampshire: Page 9

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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Coos Turnpike

Found on Court Street in Haverhill Corner Village in Haverhill, New Hampshire

“One of the first roads opened in the town connecting Haverhill, Plymouth and Concord.  Started at this point completed in 1808.  Here also was the Bliss Tavern and the first Post Office in Haverhill.  Placed by the Haverhill Chapter of the D.A.R. Aug. 20, 1925?”

Picture of Historical Marker for Coos Turnpike

“Coos Turnpike”

“The Bedell Bridge”

Found at Bedell Bridge State Park in Haverhill, New Hampshire off State Route 10 north of Haverhill Corner village

“The last of five 19th century bridges which have existed at this location was erected in 1866 by a local entrepreneur, Moody Bedell, who had operated a ferry service here prior to the first bridge in 1805.  The 396-foot structure was the largest surviving example of a two-span covered bridge utilizing the Burr truss and timber arch design. Following several years of human effort which corrected decades of deterioration, the newly-restored landmark was destroyed by a violent windstorm on September 14, 1979.”

Picture of NH Road Marker The Bedell Bridge Haverhill

“The Bedell Bridge”

Picture of Bedell Bridge in Connecticut River

Bedell Bridge in Connecticut River

“Bedell Bridge 1866 – 1979”

Found at Bedell Bridge State Park in Haverhill, New Hampshire off State Route 10 north of Haverhill Corner village

“Destroyed in a mighty windstorm on September 14, 1979.  This had been the longest two span covered burr arch truss left in America. Closed to traffic by damage in 1958 and due to be demolished in 1973.  It was restored during a six year program by Bedell Covered Bridge Inc. and reopened on July 22, 1979.”

Picture of Bedell Bridge Stone Marker in Bedell Brdige State Park in Haverhill, New Hampshire

“Bedell Bridge” Stone Marker

Picture of Bedell Bridge Entrance in the Bedell Bridge State Park in Haverhill, New Hampshire

Bedell Bridge Entrance in the Bedell Bridge State Park in Haverhill, New Hampshire

“Boston, Concord, & Montreal Railroad”

Found on Depot Street (State Route 132) at the Ashland Train Depot in Ashland, New Hampshire

“The Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad was chartered in 1844. Construction of the main line began in Concord in 1846.  The tracks were completed to Laconia in 1848, to Ashland 1849, and to Wells River, Vermont in 1853.  The B, C&M RR merged with the Concord Railroad in 1889 to form the Concord & Montreal Railroad, which was taken over by the Boston & Maine Railroad in 1895. The B, C&M RR and it’s branch lines contributed greatly to the economic development of central and northern New Hampshire and to the growth of tourism in the Lakes Region and the White Mountains.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad Ashland

“Boston, Concord, & Montreal, Railroad”

Picture of Boston, Concord & Montreal Rail Depot in Ashland, New Hampshire

Boston, Concord & Montreal Rail Depot in Ashland, New Hampshire

“Mystery Hill”

Found on State Route 28 past junction with Range Road heading south in Salem, New Hampshire

“Four miles east on Route 111 is a privately owned complex of strange stone structures bearing similarities to early stone work found in western Europe. They suggest an ancient culture may have existed here more than 2,000 years ago. Sometimes called “America’s Stonehenge,” these intriguing chambers hold a fascinating story and could be remnants of a pre-Viking or even Phoenician civilization.”

 

Picture of NH Road Marker Mystery Hill Salem

“Mystery Hill”

“The Ravine House: 1877-1963”

Found on Durand Road in Randolph, New Hampshire

Inscription: “In 1876 Abel Watson and his son Laban converted their farm on this site, facing King Ravine on Mt. Adams, into a summer boarding house. Enlarged in 1884 and subsequently, the Ravine House became a key institution in opening up the northern Presidential Range to trail builders and hikers. At its zenith between the two World Wars, the hotel accommodated some 100 guests, offering tennis courts, a bowling alley, trout fishing, a swimming pond, and hiking. It closed in 1960 and was razed in 1963.”

Picture of NH Road Marker The Ravine House Randolph

“The Ravine House”

Picture of View from Former Ravine House in Randolph New Hampshire

View from Former Ravine House in Randolph, New Hampshire

“Lake Coos and The Presidential Range”

Found on State Route 2 in Lancaster, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Lancaster, founded in 1763, lies on the bed of glacial Lake Coos, formed as the glaciers receded 14,000 years ago. Today, the Connecticut, an American Heritage River, flows along the bottom of the ancient lake. You stand at a gateway to The Great North Woods Region. To the east, aligned from north to south, are Mounts Madison, Adams, Jefferson, and Washington, the highest peaks of the White Mountain’s Presidential Range. Mt. Washington, at 6288 feet, is the highest in the Northeast. The strongest winds ever recorded, 231 miles per hour, were measured on its summit on April 12, 1934.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Lake Coos and The Presidential Range Lancaster

“Lake Coos and The Presidential Range”

Picture of View of Presidential Range from Road Marker in Lancaster New Hampshire

View of Presidential Range from Road Marker in Lancaster, New Hampshire

“Thaddeus S.C. Lowe: 1832-1913”

 Found on State Route 2 in Lancaster, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Born nearby, this inventor and scientist gained unique distinction as a pioneer aeronaut in the United States. He organized and directed a military balloon force during the Civil War and later invented a number of important and basic devices for use in atmospheric observation and metallurgical processing.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Thaddeus S.C. Lowe Lancaster

“Thaddeus S.C. Lowe”

“Original Site of the Village of Lisbon”

Found on State Route 302 north of Lisbon, New Hampshire

Inscription: “This was about the center of the first settlement of the village called Concord under its first charter in 1763.” “The second charter made in 1768 called it Gunthwaite.” “At the close of the Revolutionary War, in the entire township, comfortably settled in log cabins were only forty families and a number of bachelors.” “After the war the Concord charter was reestablished and the name remained unchanged until 1824, when it was changed to Lisbon.” “Samuel Martin, the first white man to tread the soil of Lisbon came in 1753. He found a few wigwams still occupied by the indians, who had cleared and cultivated the meadows.” “The present Young-Cobleigh-Hanno House is on the site of the old stockade and block house used for a fort. In which enlistments for the revolutionary war were made and some of the meetings of the proprietors of the town were held.” “This meadow was known as Cobleigh Meadow, where the spring musters of the militia met annually, until about 1885.” “This tablet is placed by the Gunthwaite Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1931”

Picture of NH Stone Marker Originial Site of the Village of Lisbon

“Original Site of Lisbon”

“Whitcherville”

Found on State Route 112 (Kancamagus Highway) in Landaff, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Erected by Belle Ashley Fullam in memory of Daniel and Nancy Knight Whitcher. First settlers of Whitcherville in 1860, on Bunga Road. Made famous by 12 years litigation, he owned lumber and starch mills. Was prominent in town and church affairs.”

Picture of NH Memorial Whitcherville Landaff

“Whitcherville”

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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