New Hampshire: Page 8

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Found at Bear Brook Park Entrance on Deerfield Road

Inscription: “Built in 1815 for both religious and town meetings, this rare examle of a one-story meeting house has slanted floors that offer a clear view of its simple pulpit. The building housed services of the “Christ-ian” sect until about 1860, and evangelical camp meetings until 1886, but ceased to be used for town meetings in 1876. The town deeded it to Buntin Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, in 1908. Buntin Chapter’s restoration of the building was a pioneering effort at historic preservation.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Old Allenstown Meeting House

“Old Allentown Meeting House”

Picture of Old Allenstown Meeting House

Old Allenstown Meeting House

“Meeting House Burying Ground”

Found at Bear Brook Park Entrance on Deerfield Road

Inscription: “The Old Burying Ground is enclosed within stone walls across the road. Judge Hall Burgin donated land for a meeting house and burying ground about 1807, and both parcels have always been conveyed together. There are five known graves in the cemetery: Ede Hall Burgin; his wife, Elizabeth Burgin; two daughters of Jonathan Sargent; and John Critchett. In the early 1900s, two gravestones remained visible. Buntin Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, passed the property to the state in 1991, and the state deeded it back to the town in 2004.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Meeting House Burying Ground

“Meeting House Burying Ground”

Picture of Meeting House Burying Ground

Meeting House Burying Ground

“Baker River”

Found at the rest stop on State Route 25 west of Rumney, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Known to the Indians as Asquamchumauke, the nearby river was renamed for Lt. Thomas Baker (1682-1753) whose company of 34 scounts from Northampton, Mass. passed down this valley in 1712. A few miles south his men destroyed a Pemigewasset Indian village. Massachusetts rewarded the expedition with a scalp bounty of 40 pounds and made Baker a captain.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Baker River

“Baker River”

“Honorable Nathan Clifford U.S. Supreme Court Justice 1858-1881”

Found at the rest stop on State Route 25 west of Rumney, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Born on August 18, 1803, on property behind this rest area, Nathan Clifford attended local schools and was admitted to the N.H. Bar in 1827. He moved to Newfields, Maine, was admitted to the State Legislature in 1830 and the U.S. House of Representatives in 1838. He negotiated the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 that ended the Mexican War. He was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1858 where he served until his death, July 25, 1881 in Cornish, Maine.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Honorable Nathan Clifford

“Honorable Nathan Clifford U.S. Supreme Court Justice”

“Mary Baker Eddy, 1821-1910”

Found on State Route 9 and 202 (Franklin Pierce Hwy) in Concord, New Hampshire

Inscription: “While living at her ‘Pleasant View’ home (1892-1908) once on this site, Mrs. Eddy founded The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Mass., headquarters of the Christian Science movement. From ‘Pleasant View’, some six miles from her birthplace in Bow, she guided its worldwide activities and gained fame as a religious leader and writer. The buildings erected on this site in 1927 served as a home for retired Christian Science practitioners and nurses until 1975.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Mary Baker Eddy Concord

“Mary Baker Eddy”

“State Capitol”

Found on North Main Street in Concord, New Hampshire in front of State Capitol Building

Inscription: “The State Capitol Building of New Hampshire was built in 1816-19 by Stuart J. Park.  It is constructed of New Hampshire Granite quarried in Concord.  The original part was occupied June 2, 1819 and is the nation’s oldest State Capitol in which a legislature meets in its original chambers.”

Picture of NH Road Maker State Capitol Concord, New Hampshire

Picture of New Hampshire State Capitol on North Main Street in Concord, New Hampshire 2

New Hampshire State Capitol in Concord, New Hampshire

“New Hampshire’s Presidential Primary”

Found on Park Street in Concord, New Hampshire next to State Capitol Building

Inscription: “Since 1920, New Hampshire has held its presidential primary election before any other state.  Changes in New Hampshire law in 1949 made the primary a direct selection of presidential aspirants, not a mere choice of delegates pledged to specific nominees.  Held in February or March, during the week preceding any similar elections elsewhere, the New Hampshire primary has become a critical first step on the road to the White House.  Taking their responsibility seriously, New Hampshire voters test contenders during the months leading to the primary and have usually favored the candidate who ultimately attains the Oval Office.”

Picture of NH Road Marker New Hampshire's Presidential Primary Concord, New Hampshire

“New Hampshire’s Presidential Primary”

“First Summer Playhouse”

Found at the intersection of State Route 113 and 113A in Tamworth, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Nearby stands “The Barnstormers” summer playhouse, the oldest in New Hampshire and one of the first in the nation.  Opened in 1931, at one time the cast covered a weekly 80-mile circuit.  Currently its performances are limited to this community.  Founder of the theater was Francis Grover Cleveland, son of the 22nd President.”

Picture of NH Road Marker First Summer Playhouse Tamworth, New Hampshire

“First Summer Playhouse”

“Chinook Kennels”

Found on State Route 113A in Wonalancet, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Purchased and moved to this site in 1930 by Milton and Eva B. “Short” Seeley, these kennels produced sled dogs for exploration, racing, and showing.  For almost 50 years Chinook Kennels exerted a profound influence upon the Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky breeds, and many champions were born here.  With Milton directing, dog teams were sent on the Byrd Antarctic Expeditions and to the Army’s Search and Rescue units.  After his death in 1943, Eva continued alone.  An author, sled dog racer, and dynamic contributor to the sport of dogsledding, “Short” was named to the Mushers’ Hall of Fame in Alaska.  Mrs. Seeley died in 1985 at age 94.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Chinook Kennels Wonalancet, New Hampshire

“Chinook Kennels”

Picture of Chinook Kennels Wonalancet, New Hampshire

Chinook Kennels in Wonalancet, New Hampshire

“Durgin Bridge”

Found at Durgin Bridge Road and Fellow Hill Road/Foss Flats Road in Sandwich, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Built by Jacob Berry of North Conway, this bridge is the fourth to span Swift River here since 1820.   Freshets in 1844, 1865 and 1869 destroyed the first three.  The bridge is named for James Holmes Durgin (1815-73) who ran a grist mill near it; drove stage from Sandwich to Farmington; and was a link in the underground slave railroad, Sandwich to Conway.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Durgin Bridge

“Durgin Bridge”

Picture of Durgin Covered Bridge

Durgin Covered Bridge

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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