New Hampshire: Page 7

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“Willowdale Settlement”

Found on State Route 302 north of Lisbon, New Hampshire and south of Littleton, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Willowdale was established around a sawmill that was build int 1812.  The village thrived because sawmills, gristmills, and a factory producing sawmill machinery were powered by the Ammonoosuc River.  After the Littleton Lumber Company opened in 1870, the village grew rapidly to include stores, a post office, a school, railroad siding, and a hall.  The company employed as many as 60 workers and produced 3 to 6 million board feet yearly until fire destroyed it in 1898.  The village never recovered and slowly dwindled away until it disappeared altogether, a fate suffered by other 19th century mill towns.”

NH Road Marker Willowdale Settlement Littleton

“Willowdale Settlement”

Picture of Willowdale Settlement in Littleton, New Hampshire

Willowdale Settlement in Littleton, New Hampshire

“Alderbrook”

Found on State Route 116 north of Littleton, New Hampshire and south of Whitefield, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Alderbrook developed around a sawmill built by H.C. Libbey in 1877.  The village grew to include a post office, a dozen company-owned houses, a boarding house, school and railroad station.  The mill employed as many as 40 to 60 men and cut as much as 3 to 5 million board feet each year of lumber, clapboards, lath and shingles.  It was sold to a Portland company in July 1909 and was destroyed by fire five months later.  The blaze was likely started by a spark from a freight engine.  The mill was not rebuilt and the once productive hamlet disappeared as the company left for other tracts of lumber.”

NH Road Marker Alderbrook Littleton

“Alderbrook”

“Wilder-Holton House”

Found on State Route 2 in Lancaster, New Hampshire past the junction for State Route 3 heading north.

Inscription: “This structure, erected by Major Jonas Wilder, from boards planed and nails wrought on the site, originally  possessing a four-fireplace chimney and Indian shutters, is Coos County’s first two-story dwelling.  Construction was initiated on the noted “Dark Day” of May 19, 1780, which caused work to cease temporarily.  Successively a home, a tavern, a church and a meeting place, it is now a museum.”

NH Road Marker Wilder-Holton House Lancaster

“Wilder-Holton House”

Picture of Wilder-Holton House in Lancaster New Hampshire

Wilder-Holton House in Lancaster New Hampshire

“Pierce Bridge”

Found on State Route 302 east of the town of Bethlehem, New Hampshire

Inscription: “By 1920 the adjacent road, Rt. 302 was part of the Teddy Roosevelt (TR) Trail, which ran from Maine to Oregon.  It was an important way for tourists to access the White Mountains.  After the 1927 floods, many bridges needed to be quickly replaced.  With vertical members in compression and diagonals in tension, the High Pratt truss was strong and easy to construct, making it a favorite of state highway engineers.  This riveted steel span was erected in 1929, keeping this important crossing in use.”

NH Road Marker Pierce Bridge

“Pierce Bridge”

“Cherry Mountain Slide”

Found on State Route 3 in the town of Jefferson at the Cherry Mountain trailhead

Inscription: “On July 10, 1885, at 6 a.m., a slide from Cherry Mountain’s northern peak left a deep gash from Owl’s Head to the valley.  A million tons of boulders, trees and mud loosed by a cloudburst rolled and tumbled a tortuous two miles, destroying Oscar Stanley’s new home and his cattle, barn and crops.  Farm hand Don Walker, rescued from debris of the barn, died four days later; but Stanley’s family was not there and was spared.  Excursion trains and carriages brought people from far and wide to view the tragic sight, which has now almost disappeared through nature’s healing process.”

NH Road Marker Cherry Mountain Slide

“Cherry Mountain Slide”

“Blue Star Memorial Highway”

Found on State Route 2 past Gorham, New Hampshire at a rest stop before the Maine border

Inscription: “A tribute to the Armed Forces that have defended the United States of America.  Sponsored by N.H. Federation of State Garden Clubs, Inc. in cooperation with N.H. Public Works and Highways”

NH Road Marker Blue Star Memorial Highway

“The Ridge”

Found at junction of Bridge Street (State Route 25A) and State Route 10 in Orford, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Orford’s seven Ridge houses were built over a period of time from 1773 to 1839 by professional and business men of the town.  The Bulfinch-style house of John B. Wheeler, build 1814-1816, southernmost in the row, was designed by a Boston architect, probably Asher Benjamin who was then an associate of Charles Bulfinch.  Other Ridge houses also display Asher Benjamin influence.”

NH Road Marker The Ridge Orford

“The Ridge”

“Kilburn Brothers: Stereoscopic View Factory”

Found in Littleton, New Hampshire on Cottage Street (State Routes 10 and 18)

Inscription: “Here, from 1867 to 1909, the world famous Kilburn brothers, Benjamin and Edward, produced and distributed thousands of stereoscopic views.  Their collection, largest in the world and collector’s items today, provided popular parlor entertainment for generations.”

NH Road Marker Kilburn Brothers Littleton

“Kilburn Brothers: Stereoscopic View Factory”

“Stone Arch Bridges”

Found in Hillsborough, New Hampshire at the junction of State Routes 202 and 149 (Main Street)

Inscription: “Beginning in the 1830s, a few arched granite highway bridges were built in southern New Hampshire under the supervision of engineers from major manufacturing centers.  By the 1850s, rural stonemasons had mastered the art of building such bridges without mortar.  Hiram Monroe (1799 – 1871), active in town affairs persuaded Hillsborough to build a dozen.  Five survive, and a sixth is covered by Franklin Pierce Lake.  Among the local builders were Reuben E. Loveren (1817 – 1883), and brothers Calvin A. Gould (1826 – 1877) and James H. Gould (1828 – 1890).  All three worked on this, the double-arched Sawyer Bridge, in 1866.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Stone Arch Bridge Hillsborough

“Stone Arch Bridges”

Picture of Stone Arch Bridge Hillsborough

Stone Arch Bridge in Hillsborough, New Hampshire

“Amoskeag Mills”

Found in Manchester, New Hampshire at the intersection of Canal Street and West Pennacook Street

Inscription: “Samuel Blodgett began a canal to bypass the steep falls in 1793, with money provided by a lottery.  The canal was finished in 1807.  Mills then sprang up on both sides of the river below the falls.  The world renowned Amoskeag Manufacturing Company flourished here for a century, operating 64 mills, covering a mile and a half of ground, housing 700,000 spindles and 23,000 looms which turned out 500,000 yards of cloth each week.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Amoskeag Mills Manchester

“Amoskeag Mills”

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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