New Hampshire: Page 6

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont


View Northern New England Historical Road Markers in a larger map

“Potter Place”

Found on State Route 11 in New London, New Hampshire

Inscription: “The community takes its name from Richard Potter, noted magician, ventriloquist and showman. This 19th century master of the Black Arts was known throughout America. He died here in 1835 in his mansion, a showplace in the town. He is buried in a small plot on his once extensive estate.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Potter Place Andover

“Potter Place”

“Hominy Pot”

Found on State Route 11 in New London, New Hampshire

Inscription: “In the vicinity of this marker, during the last quarter of the 189th century, were built the first homes and the original schoolhouse of New London. Along this brook, developed by several men at different times, were a saw mill, a grist mill, a carding and cloth-dressing mill, a hat factory, and a shingle mill–all powered by falling water. This industrial area has been variously called ‘Minot’s Square,’ ‘Harvey’s Mills,’ ‘Trussell’s Mills,’ and, most lastingly, ‘Hominy Pot.'”

Picture of NH Road Marker Hominy Pot New London

“Hominy Pot”

“The Home of Moses Trussell (1753-1843)”

Found on State Route 114 in New London, New Hampshire

Inscription: “The house up the hill on the right was built by Moses Trussell in 1808. Born in Plaistow, N.H. Trussell lived with an older brother in Hopkinton until his maturity. In 1774 as a pioneer he made the first clearing in what is now New London, on a site south of the present King Hill Road. In April, 1775, he enlisted in Col. John Stark’s First New Hampshire Regiment. At the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775, he lost his left arm by a direct hit from a British cannon ball. The musket whish he used in that encounter is still preserved by the Town of New London. After recovering from his wound, Trussell taught school for some years. Then he married and settled in New London on an 80-acre farm extending along both sides of the present highway. He died in April 1843, five months short of his 90th birthday. His house and farm remained under Trussell ownership until 1889.”

Picture of NH Road Marker The Home of Moses Trussell New London

“The Home of Moses Trussell (1753-1843)”

Picture of The Home of Moses Trussell in New London, New Hampshire

The Home of Moses Trussell in New London, New Hampshire

“Herrick Homestead and Tavern”

Found on State Route 114 in New London, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Built 1812 for Jonathan Herrick, Jr. Here he kept Store, Tavern and Stage Coach Stop for the daily journey from Lowell, Massachusetts to Hanover, New Hampshire, first run in 1832″ Now known as The Colby Lane House”

Picture of NH Road Marker Herrick Homestead and Tavern New London

“Herrick Homestead and Tavern”

Picture of Herrick Homestead and Tavern in New London, New Hampshire

Herrick Homestead and Tavern in New London, New Hampshire

“The Old Campus”

Found on State Route 114 in New London, New Hampshire

Inscription: “In the pioneer years of New London this open tract was included in the farm of Ezekiel Sargent. His home is now part of the New London Inn. The acreage is today the property of Colby-Sawyer College. Four school buildings once stood here. As we face the lot from Main Street, these were the Original Academy (1838); the Heidelberg, a girls’ dormitory (1853); the Gymnasium (1895); and Colby Hall, a boys’ dormitory (1854). Now only the “Old Academy” remains. But the outlines of the former structures and of an ancient tennis court may still be seen on the green lawn.”

Picture of NH Road Marker The Old Campus New London

“The Old Campus”

Picture of The Old Campus of Colby-Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire

The Old Campus of Colby-Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire

“Asquamchumauke”

Found on State Route 3 in Plymouth, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Asquamchuamauke was the name of the Baker River in the language of the Pemigewasset Indians meaning “crooked water from high places.” Here was the site of their Indian village. On these meadows they cultivated corn. In the sandy banks of the river they stored their furs. In March, 1712, Lieutenant Thomas Baker and thirty scouts destroyed the village and killed many Indians including the Chief Waternummus.”

“Erected by The Asquamchumauke Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution in 1940.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Asquamchumauke Plymouth

“Asquamchumauke”

“Kearsarge Peg Mill”

Found on State Route 3 in Plymouth, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Site of an early 20th century peg mill. The original mill remains intact and since 2002 has housed the COMMON MAN INN. Established in 1898 by Jacob R. Foster and managed by his sons, Edwin J. and George R., the mill produced 300 bushels per day of split shoe pegs, then used worldwide in shoe manufacture. 2,500 cords of yellow birch were consumed annually. An innovative aspect of the process made use of the mill’s waste woods to fuel its 100 horsepower boilers. The mill was thus energy independent. The mill closed after WWI; other wooden products were produced until 2001.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Kearsarge Peg Mill Plymouth

“Kearsarge Peg Mill”

“Samuel Livermore (1732-1803)”

Found on State Route 175A in Plymouth, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Proprietor of more than half the Town of Holderness, this jurist, congressman and senator was New Hampshire’s first attorney general and second chief justice. In 1788 he spurred the State’s approval of the proposed Federal Constitution, thus insuring its ratification and the formation of the present Government of the United States.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Samuel Livermore Plymouth

“Samuel Livermore (1732-1803)”

“Smith Bridge”

Found on Smith Bridge Road in Plymouth, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Named for local farmer Jacob Smith, the first bridge at this site was begun before 1786 and completed with the aid of a lottery authorized in that year. In 1850, contractor Harmon Marcy of Littleton, N.H. built a new bridge at a cost of about $2,700, using a pre-stressed wooden truss patented by Col. Stephen Harriman Long (1784-1864) of Hopkinton, N.H. After an arsonist burned the 143-year-old span in 1993, the state constructed this two-lane bridge. Built with glue-laminated timbers and arches at a cost of $3.3 million and dedicated in 2001, the new span was designed to bear the same loads as interstate highway bridges.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Smith Bridge Plymouth

“Smith Bridge”

Picture of Smith Bridge in Plymouth, New Hampshire

Smith Bridge in Plymouth, New Hampshire

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

Please add your thoughtful comment . . .