New Hampshire: Page 5

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“Contoocook Railroad Bridge and Depot”

Found on State Route 123 in Contoocook, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Built in 1889 on the granite abutments of an older span, this is the world’s oldest surviving covered railroad bridge. It was probably designed by Boston & Maine Railroad engineer Jonathan Parker Snow (1848-1933) and built by carpenter David Hazelton (1832-1908). Under Snow, the Boston & Maine utilized wooden bridges on its branch lines until after 1900, longer than any other major railroad. The nearby depot was built in 1850 on the earlier Concord & Claremont Railroad, which was acquired by the Boston & Maine in 1887.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Contoocook Railroad Bridge and Depot Contoocook

“Contoocook Railroad Bridge and Depot”

Picture of Railroad Bridge in Contoocook New Hampshire

Railroad Bridge in Contoocook, New Hampshire

Picture of Train Depot in Contoocook New Hampshire

Train Depot in Contoocook, New Hampshire

Picture of Train Car in Contoocook New Hampshire

Train Car in Contoocook, New Hampshire

“Ladd-Gilman House”

Found on Water Street (State Routes 27 & 111A) in Exeter, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Built about 1721 as one of New Hampshire’s earliest brick houses, and enlarged and clapboarded in the 1750s, this dwelling served as the state treasury during the Revolution. Here were born John Taylor Gilman (1753-1828), who was elected governor fro an unequalled total of fourteen years, and his brother Nicholas Gilman, Jr. (1755-1814), a signer of the U.S. Constitution. The house has been maintained since 1902 by the Society of the Cincinnati.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Ladd-Gilman House Exeter

“Ladd-Gilman House”

Picture of Ladd-Gilman House Exeter New Hampshire

Ladd-Gilman House in Exeter, New Hampshire

“Exeter Town House”

Found on Front Street in Exeter, New Hampshire

Inscription: “The historic Town House of Exeter stood near this site. Here on January 5, 1776, the Provincial Congress adopted and signed the first state constitution thereby establishing an independent state government, the first of the thirteen colonies. The newly created legislative Assembly met here during the Revolution. The Town House remained in use until replaced by a new structure in 1793.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Exeter Town House Exeter

“Exeter Town House”

“Revolutionary Capital”

Found on Front Street in Exeter, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Founded by Rev. John Wheelwright in 1638, Exeter was one of the four original towns in the colony. Following New Hampshire’s provisional declaration of independence on January 5, 1776, it served as the capital of the new state during the period of the American Revolution.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Revolutionary Capital Exeter

“Revolutionary Capital”

“Spaulding & Frost Cooperage”

Found on State Route 107 in Fremont, New Hampshire

Inscription: “The Cooperage was founded here in 1874 by Jonas Spaulding, Jr. After his death in 1900, his sons, tow of whom became New Hampshire governors, served as company officers; Stephen Frost, who bought into the firm in 1893, served as manager. Rebuilt after devastating fires in 1921 and 1973, the Spaulding & Frost Cooperage is not the oldest white pine cooperage in the United States.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Spaulding & Frost Cooperage Fremont

“Spaulding & Frost Cooperage”

Spaulding & Frost Cooperage Fremont New Hampshire

Spaulding & Frost Cooperage in Fremont, New Hampshire

“Rockingham Memorial”

Found at junction of State Route 111A and Haigh Road in Brentwood, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Brentwood’s meetinghouse could not hold the nearly 2,000 Federalists who gathered fro the Friends of Peace rally here on August 5, 1812. So “under the great canopy of Heaven,” Daniel Webster read hist “Rockingham Memorial,” opposing the United State’s entry into the War of 1812. Although he had not held any previous elective office, before the meeting ended Webster was chosen to run for Congress on the Peace Ticket. He won the election and became a national figure.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Rockingham Memorial Brentwood

“Rockingham Memorial”

“John Brown Family-Gunsmiths”

Found on State Route 111A in Fremont, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Around 1845 John Brown of Poplin, now Fremont, built this gun shop, and with sons Andrew & Freeman spent 62 years producing fine target and hunting rifles, shotguns, and pistols. During the Civil War these prominent gunsmiths made firearms for the U.S. Government, and in 1861 their gun shop served as a recruiting office for enlisting Union sharpshooters.”

Picture of NH Road Marker John Brown Family Gunsmiths Fremont

“John Brown Family-Gunsmiths”

Picture of John Brown Family Gunsmiths Home in Fremont New Hampshire

John Brown Family’s Home in Fremont, New Hampshire

“Mast Tree Riot of 1734”

Found at junction of State Routes 111A and 107 in Raymond, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Local lumbermen illegally cut Mast Trees reserved fro the King’s Royal Navy. When David Dunbar, Surveyor General, visited nearby Copyhold Mill to inspect fallen lumber, local citizens assembled, discharged firearms and convinced Dunbar to leave. Returning with 10 men, Dunbar’s group was attacked and dispersed at a local tavern by citizens disguised as ‘Indians.'”

Picture of NH Road Marker Mast Tree Riot of 1734 Raymond

“Mast Tree Riot of 1734”

“Meetinghouse and Hearse House”

Found on State Route 107 in Raymond, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Built in 1800, this steepleless structure, originally unheated, was used for both town and church meetings. This and a similar building in Rockingham, Vt., are the only two survivors of some 70 meeting houses with twin end “porches” (stairwells) built in New England in the 1700s. The building retains box pews (once privately owned) and a high pulpit. “Singing seats” in the gallery reflect the introduction of choral music in the late 1700s. The nearby hearse house (1849) marks a transition in local funerals from a hand-carried bier to a horse-drawn vehicle.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Meetinghouse and Hearse House Raymond

“Meetinghouse and Hearse House”

Picture of Meetinghouse and Hearse House Raymond New Hampshire

Meetinghouse and Hearse House Raymond, New Hampshire

“Civil War Riot of 1861”

Found at junction of State Route 107 and Sandown Road in Raymond, New Hampshire

Inscription: “in 1928, the Exeter News-Letter printed an eye-witness account of Fremont’s July 4, 1861 Civil War riot, written by 77-year-old Alden F. Sanborn. After Fremont’s loyal citizens raised a 150-foot “liberty-pole” at nearby Liberty Square and had run up the Union flag, “a southern sympathizer moved to put a bullet through it. Someone immediately moved to put a bullet through that man. (A small riot ensued) which was soon squelched with the aid of the brave boys in Blue, on of whom remark(ed ‘If) we were going to fight the rebels . . . we had soon commence here as anywhere.'”

Picture of NH Road Marker Civil War Riot of 1861 Raymond

“Civil War Riot of 1861”

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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