New Hampshire: Page 4

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“The Pierce Manse”

Found on Penacook Street in Concord, New Hampshire

Inscription: “One tenth of a mile east of here stands the only house in Concord owned (1842 – 1848) by Franklin Pierce, 14th President of the United States. Removed to this site in 1971 from Montgomery Street, it was restored by The Pierce Brigade. Opened to the public in 1974, it is now an important tourist attraction.”

Picture of NH Road Marker The Pierce Manse Concord

“The Pierce Manse”

Picture of The Pierce Mansion in Concord New Hampshire

The Pierce Mansion in Concord, New Hampshire

“Franklin Pierce 1804 – 1869 Fourteenth President of the United States (1853 – 1857)”

Found in the Old North Cemetery on North State Street in Concord, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Lies buried in nearby Minot enclosure. Native son of New Hampshire, graduate of Bowdoin College, lawyer, effective political leader, Congressman and U.S. Senator, Mexican War veteran, courageous advocate of States’ Rights, he was popularly known as “Young Hickory of the Granite Hills.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Franklin Pierce Grave Concord

“Franklin Pierce”

“Ratification of the Federal Constitution”

Found at the intersection of Church Street and Bouton Street in Concord, New Hampshire

Inscription: “The convention of delegates from 175 New Hampshire towns took place on June 21, 1788, in the Old North Meeting House which stood on this site from 1751 until destroyed by fire in 1870. The delegates approved the proposed Federal Constitution by majority vote. New Hampshire, the ninth state to ratify this historic document, thereby assured its adoption.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Ratification of the Federal Constitution Concord

“Ratification of the Federal Constitution”

“Walker School”

Found at the intersection of Church Street and Bouton Street in Concord, New Hampshire

Inscription: “On this spot, consecrated to religion and learning, was erected in 1761 the first framed meeting house in Concord, which was used for ninety one years as a place of worship by The First Congregational Society of the town, and within whose walls assembled in 1788 the Ninth State Convention which ratified the Constitution of the United States. From 1847 to 1867 it was occupied by The Methodist General Biblical Institute. Burned in 1870, its site was purchased by the Union School District, which has caused to be erected thereon this structure, A.D. 18783. Inscription over the entrance of the first Walker School.”

Picture of NH Stone Marker Walker School Concord

“Walker School”

“First Framed Meeting House”

Found at the intersection of Church Street and Bouton Street in Concord, New Hampshire

Inscription: “On this historical site built – 1751 the first framed meeting house where the New Hampshire Convention ratified the Federal Constitution thereby assuring its adoption June 21, 1788. A memorial to the soldiers of this town who took part in the War of the Revolution. Placed by Rumford Chapter – 1915 Daughters of the American Revolution replaced – 1962”

Picture of NH Stone Marker First Framed House Concord New Hampshire

“First Framed Meeting House”

“Suncook Village”

Found in Suncook Village in Pembroke, New Hampshire

Inscription: “The waters of Suncook River were harnessed in the 1730’s, eventually powering saw and grist mills, forge shops, and paper mills. The first cotton factory, owned by Major Caleb Stark, was built here in 1811. By 1900, Pembroke Mill, Webster Mill, and China Mill employed more than 1500 workers, mostly recruited from the Province of Quebec, to make 35 million yards of cotton cloth each year. Suncook’s commercial center, built of native brick and granite, attained its present appearance by 1887. It is one of the best-preserved small manufacturing villages in New Hampshire.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Suncook Village Pembroke

“Suncook Village”

“Suncook Connection Bridge”

Found in Suncook Village in Pembroke, New Hampshire

Inscription: “In 1931, the N.H. State Highway Department built an unusual double-deck truss bridge over the Suncook River to remove traffic on the Daniel Webster Highway (Route 3) from Main Street in Suncook Village. Designed by Harold E. Langley (1896 – 1991), an award-winning department engineer, the bridge allowed high-speed bypass travel on the upper deck while providing connections with the Suncook Valley Road (Buck Street) on the lower deck. It was the only double-deck bridge in N.H. when it was replaced in 2007. Local sentiment persuaded highway officials to build a similar but larger span.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Suncook Connection Bridge Pembroke

“Suncook Connection Bridge”

Picture of Suncook Connection Bridge in Pembroke New Hampshire

Suncook Connection Bridge in Pembroke, New Hampshire

“First Meeting House”

Found on State Route 3 north of Suncook Village in the Pembroke, New Hampshire

Inscription: “This is the site of the first meeting  house in Suncook, incorporated as Pembroke in 1759. Granted to soldiers in Lovewell’s Indian War (1722 – 25) or their survivors, the land was largely settled by Congregationalists from Massachusetts Bay. Their first meeting house was “made of Good Hewn Loggs” in 1733. It measured 24 by 30 feet and housed town meetings and religious services. The building was improved in 1735 with seats, window glass, and a pulpit. In 1746, it was replaced by a two-story framed building, which was moved around 1806 and converted to the barn standing to the northwest.”

Picture of NH Road Marker First Meeting House Pembroke

“First Meeting House”

“David Wayne Hildreth Dam”

Found on State Route 25 in Warren, New Hampshire

Inscription: “This dam dedicated in memory of David Wayne Hildreth SP-4 – U.S. Army Warren, New Hampshire Killed in Action serving his country Vietnam Conflict Sept. 19, 1949 – April 14, 1969”

“Baker River Watershed, David Wayne Hildreth Dam, Drainage area: 4,250 acres, Total Storage: 1,775 Acre-Feet, Flood Storage: 1,335 Acre-Feet, Recreation Storage: 440 Acre-Feet, Water Surface Area: 37 Acres, Height of Dam: 65 Feet, Volume of Fill: 306,000 Cubic Yards, built under the Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act by New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development New Hampshire Water Resources Board and Grafton County Conservation District with the assistance of Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture 1967”

Picture of NH Memorial David Wayne Hildreth Dam Warren

“David Wayne Hildreth Dam”

“Major Andrew McClary”

Found at closed rest stop on State Routes 202/4 in Epsom, New Hampshire

Inscription : “Andrew McClary served in the famed Rogers Rangers. He participated in the December 1774 raids on the British Fort, William & Mary in New Castle, at which time powder and munitions were seized. Learning of the pending conflict at Bunker Hill while tilling his land just south of here he left his plow in the furrow in his haste to meet the challenge. McClary was named 2nd in command to Col. John Stark of the 1st N.H. Regiment. A British cannonball felled him as the battle ended, prompting the eulogy: “His sun went down at noon on the day that ushered in our nation’s birth.”

Note: To read more about the “famed Rogers Rangers” see New Hampshire Road Markers Page 1

Picture of NH Road Marker Major Andrew McClary

“Major Andrew McClary”

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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