New Hampshire: Page 3

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“George Hoyt Whipple”

Found on State Routes 25/3 in Ashland, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Nearby, on Pleasant Street, is the birthplace and childhood home of George Hoyt Whipple, pathologist, researcher and teacher.  Dr. Whipple’s most significant research led to the development of the liver therapy for pernicious anemia.  For  his work, he shared the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1934.”

Picture of NH Road Marker George Hoyt Whipple Ashland, New Hampshire

“George Hoyt Whipple”

“Mount Washington Hotel”

Found on State Route 302 east of the junction with State Route 3

Inscription: “Standing to the east, the Mount Washington Hotel was completed in 1902 as one of the largest, most modern grand hotels in the White Mountains, one of the few built in a single campaign.  Designed by New York architect Charles Alling Gifford (1861-1937), the hotel was financed by Concord, N.H. native Joseph Stickney (1840-1903), an industrialist who had purchased 10,000 acres here in 1881.  Served by as many as 57 trains a day, the Mount Washington Hotel became known as one of the most luxurious  summer resorts in the United States.  It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1986.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Mount Washington Hotel

“Mount Washington Hotel”

Picture of Mount Washington Hotel

Mount Washington Hotel

“Bretton Woods Monetary Conference”

Found on State Route 302 east of the junction with State Route 3

Inscription: “This site in the town of Carroll, named “Bretton Woods” in 1903 to recall the original land grant of 1772, was chosen in July 1944 as the location of one of the most important meetings of the 20th century.  Convened by the allied nations before the end of WWII and attended by representatives of 44 countries, the Bretton Woods Conference established regulations for the international monetary system following the war.  The Fund and the future World Bank, and linked the exchange rate of world currencies to the value of gold.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Bretton Woods Monetary Conference

“Bretton Woods Monetary Conference”

“Anderson Memorial”

Found on State Route 302 east of the junction with State Route 3

Inscription: “In Memoriam:  Samuel Jameson Anderson (1824-1905), President and John Farwell Anderson (1823-1887), Chief Engineer of the Portland and Ogdensburg Railroad the organization and construction of which are due to their untiring energy and skill.  John Anderson (1853-1911), son of Samuel Jameson Anderson, throughout his life a lover of these mountains and active in the development of this region.  Men of firm integrity and purpose loyal to their ideals and friendships.”

Picture of Anderson Memorial Plaque near Mount Washington Hotel

Anderson Memorial Plaque

Picture of Anderson Memorial near Mount Washington Hotel

Anderson Memorial near Mount Washington Hotel

“Crawford House”

Found on State Route 302 in the Crawford State Park

Inscription: “Abel Crawford and son, Ethan Allen Crawford, built the first Crawford House in 1828.  It was fun by Ethan’s brother, Thomas, until sold in 1852.  Fires in 1854 and 1859 destroyed the original inn and a replacement.  Col. Cyrus Eastman erected the third and present Crawford House.  It opened July 1859 to continue a tradition of hospitality to White Mountain visitors.  Among them have been Daniel Webster, Nathaniel Hawthorne, John Greenleaf Whittier and Presidents Pierce, Grant, Hayes, Garfield and Harding.” [Note: Crawford House was permanently destroyed by fire in 1977]

Picture of NH Road Marker Crawford House

“Crawford House”

Picture of Crawford Depot

Crawford Depot

“The Crawford Family”

Found on State Route 302 east of the junction with State Route 3

Inscription: “For whom the Notch is named, included Abel and his sons, Thomas J. and Ethan Allen.  They established the first regional hotels and pioneered in opening the White Mountain Area to the public.  Ethan and his wife, Lucy Howe Crawford, author of an 1846 history of the region, are buried in a nearby cemetery.”

Picture of NH Road Marker The Crawford Family

“The Crawford Family”

“Crawford Notch Road”

Found on State Route 302 in the White Mountain National Forest west of Bartlett

Inscription: “Between 1771 and 1785, a rough road through Crawford Notch was constructed to facilitate trade and travel.  In the early 1800s, the Tenth New Hampshire Turnpike was built along the old road, from Bartlett through the Notch.  Spurred on by tourism in the White Mountains, the turnpike became Route 18, a part of the 1903 state highway system.  During the 1920s, the state road was incorporated into the Theodore Roosevelt Highway, a transcontinental roadway.  Reminders of its early automobile and tourism heritage are evident along today’s US Route 302, which is a part of the White Mountain Trail, a National Scenic Byway.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Crawford Notch Road

“Crawford Notch Road”

“Sawyer’s Rock”

Found on State Route 302 in the White Mountain National Forest west of Bartlett

Inscription: “In 1771, Timothy Nash of Lancaster and Benjamin Sawyer of Conway made a bargain with Governor John Wentworth to bring a horse through Crawford Notch in order to prove the route’s commercial value.  The pair succeeded by draggin and lowering the animal down rock faces.  Sawyer’s Rock is said to be the last obstacle they encountered before reaching the Bartlett intervales.  Nash and Sawyer were rewarded with a 2,184 acre parcel at the northern end of the Notch.  Sawyer’s Rock symbolizes the determination and foresight that helped open and develop trade and travel into the White Mountains region.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Sawyer's Rock

“Sawyer’s Rock”

“White Mountain School of Art”

Found on State Route 302 at the Scenic View area north of North Conway Village

Inscription: “Since Thomas Cole’s visit in 1828, New Hampshire’s splendid scenery has been an enduring inspiration to countless landscape artists.  From 185 to 1890 this region was particularly favored for their easels.  Benjamin Champney (1817-1907), New Hampshire-born painter, described the glorious era in “Sixty Years of Art and Artists”.”

Picture of NH Road Marker White Mountain School of Art Conway

“White Mountain School of Art”

Picture of White Mountain School of Art Vista

White Mountain School of Art Vista

Col. Charles Johnston

Found on State Route 10 in the village of Haverhill Corner in Haverhill, New Hampshire

“House used as blockhouse in the revolution.  First frame house at Haverhill Corner.  Built about 1770 by Col. Charles Johnston.  A founder of Haverhill.  A hero of Bennington.  Home till 1842 of his son Capt. Michael Johnston.  And till 1874 of his grandson Michael Johnston.  Also of his great-grandchildren till 1882.  This tablet erected by descendants under auspices of Haverhill Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1925.”

Picture of Historical Marker for Col. Charles Johnston, A Founder of Haverhill, A Hero of Bennington

“Col. Charles Johnston”

Picture of Col. Charles Johnston's House on Dartmouth College Hwy in Haverhill Corner Village in Haverhill, New Hampshire

Col. Charles Johnston’s House in Haverhill Corner Village in Haverhill, New Hampshire

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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