New Hampshire: Page 2

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont


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“Birthplace of Horace Greeley”

Found in Amherst, New Hampshire at the junction of State Route 101 and Horace Greeley Road

Inscription: “About five miles north of Amherst is the birthplace of Horace Greeley (1811 – 1872), founder of the New York Tribune, member of Congress, and candidate for President in 1872.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Birthplace of Horace Greeley Amherst

“Birthplace of Horace Greeley”

“The MacDowell Graves”

Found in Peterborough, New Hampshire on High Street in the village

Inscription: “Buried on this site are noted composer Edward MacDowell (1860 – 1908) and his wife, Marian Nevins MacDowell (1857 – 1956). The composer often paused at this boulder to watch the sun set behind Mount Monadnock. Edward and Marian purchased a small farm and moved to Peterborough in 1896. Together they founded The MacDowell Colony in 1907, the first and leading residency program for artists in the United States. On the acres to the north and west of this site, The MacDowell Colony continues to offer talented artists ideal working conditions in which they can produce enduring works of the imagination.”

Picture of NH Road Marker The MacDowell Graves Peterborough

“The Macdowell Graves”

Picture of The MacDowell Graves Peterborough

The MacDowell Graves in Peterborough, New Hampshire

“Dublin, New Hampshire”

Found in Dublin, New Hampshire on State Route 101 in the village round-about

Inscription: “Originally ‘Monadnock No. 3.’ Highest village in New England, according to United States survey, 1,493 feet above sea-level. The greater part of Monadnock Mt. lies within town, which received its charter from King George the Third, in 1771.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Dublin New Hampshire

“Dublin, New Hampshire”

“Store and Hotel Site”

Found in Dublin, New Hampshire on State Route 101 just west of village

Inscription: “In 1825, Joseph Appleton sold needed merchandise at his store here, including Medford Rum, which cost 3 cents per glass with sugar; 2 cents without. Hotel Appleton House opened on this site in 1877, renamed The Leffingwell. It burned in 1908”

Picture of NH Road Marker Store and Hotel Site Dublin

“Store and Hotel Site”

“First Free Library”

Found in Dublin, New Hampshire on State Route 101 just west of village

Inscription: “In this house was established (1822) the First Free Public Library in America, supported by voluntary contribution; through the vision and efforts of Rev. Levi W. Leonard, D.D., whose home was here.”

Picture of NH Road Marker First Free Library Dublin

“First Free Library”

“Major John Simpson”

Found at the junction of State Route 107/43 and Meeting House Hill Road in Deerfield, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Born in Deerfield and buried in Old Center Cemetery on road west, he gained fame by the unauthorized firing of the first shot at Bunker Hill while serving as a private in Captain Dearborn’s Company of Colonel Stark’s Regiment. Although reprimanded for this disobedience, he afterward served his country with honor.

Picture of NH Road Marker Major John Simpson

“Major John Simpson”

Picture of Major John Simpson Cemetary Plaque

Major John Simpson Cemetary Plaque in Deerfield, New Hampshire

“College Road”

Found at the junction of State Route 109 (Governor John Wentworth Hwy) and Lang Pond Road in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Governor John Wentworth and the King’s Council voted in the spring of 1771 that a highway be made from the Governor’s estate at Wolfeborough to Dartmouth College. Joseph Senter, David Copp and Samuel Shepard surveyed the 67-mile road which followed this route to Plymouth. Thence it passed through Groton, around Lary’s and Goose ponds, over Moose Mountain to Hanover. Wentworth rode over it to Dartmouth’s first commencement, August 28, 1771.”

Picture of NH Road Marker College Road

“College Road”

Picture of NH Road Marker College Road Plaque

“College Road Plaque”

“Jonathan ‘Jocky’ Fogg, Patriot”

Found on Main Street in Pittsfield, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Jocky Fogg epitomizes the youth who suffered to defend our liberty during the Revolutionary War. Hearing about the clash at Lexington and Concord while planting peas at this site, he immediately marched to Cambridge and fought in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Fogg later survived the ill-fated winter march to Quebec under Benedict Arnold. Of the 1100 men who left, only half reached the city, cold and starved. Captured and imprisoned for nine months under deplorable conditions, Fogg returned to Pittsfield and married Sarah Cram, daughter of the town’s founder.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Jonathan Jockey Fogg Patriot Pittsfield

“Jonathan ‘Jocky’ Fogg, Patriot”

“First New Hampshire Turnpike”

Found at the junction of State Routes 4, 9 and 202 and State Route 107

Inscription: “Extending 36 miles from Piscataqua Bridge in Durham to the Merrimack River in East Concord, this highway was originally a toll road. The first of more than 80 New Hampshire turnpikes built by private corporations in the nineteenth century, this was the only one connecting Portsmouth, the state’s seaport, with the interior settlements. Chartered in 1796, the corporation began to build the road about 1801. Much of the present Route 4 follows the four rod (66 foot) right-of-way of this first turnpike.”

Picture of NH Road Marker First New Hampshire Turnpike

“First New Hampshire Turnpike”

“Bear Brook CCC Camp 1935 – 1942”

Found at Bear Brook Park Entrance on Deerfield Road

Inscription: “The Bear Brook Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp was one 28 work camps established in N.H. between 1933 and 1942. President Franklin D. Roosevelt started the program after the Depression to put young unemployed men to work in conservation. From 1935 to 1938 the 1123rd Co. CCC was here; later this was one of four CCC camps in the state to employ World War I veterans. Bear Brook was the last active CCC camp in N.H. and was given to the state in 1943. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 as one of the country’s most intact CCC camps.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Beer Brook CCC Camp

“Bear Brook CCC Camp”

Picture of Bear Brook Park Map

Bear Brook Park Map

“Old Allenstown Meeting House”

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

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