New Hampshire: Page 12

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont


View Northern New England Historical Road Markers in a larger map

“Loveland Bridge”

Found on Stinson Lake Road in Rumney, New Hampshire

Inscription: “The crutch mill of Lewis H. Loveland, Jr., once located below this bridge, operated from 1890 into the early 20th century, when some thirty industries drew water power from the four mile length of Stinson Brook. Loveland, known as “King of Crutches,” sent exports as far away as Africa and Australia. During the World War I period his company manufactured more than 3,000 pairs weekly. Loveland’s productivity and that of other local mills gave Rumney distinction as the “Crutch Capital of the World.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Loveland Bridge Rumney

“Loveland Bridge”

“Blair Bridge”

Found on Blair Road in Campton, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Hiram W. Merrill (1822-1898) of Plymouth, N.H., built this bridge in 1870 to replace a span of 1829 that had been burned by an arsonist. The bridge employs a truss design patented by Col. Stephen Harriman Long (1784-1864) of Hopkinton, N.H. It is New Hampshire’s only surviving example of Long’s patent to retain wedges at the lower chords by which the trusses were pre-stressed during construction, stiffening the bridge against the weight of the traffic. Covered bridge expert Milton S. Graton (1908-199) restored the structure in 1977.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Blair Bridge Campton

Picture of Blair Bridge in Campton, New Hampshire

Blair Bridge in Campton, New Hampshire

“Home Site of Nathaniel Berry Governor, 1861-1863”

Found on Groton Road in Hebron, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Governor Berry led the state through the Civil War. As one of the signers, he read the Altoona (PA) Conference letter to Pres. Lincoln in Washington. The letter pledges 22 governors’ support of the Union cause via a commitment to provide additional soldiers to the war effort, as well as supporting the Emancipation Proclamation, issued Jan. 1, 1863. Berry was instrumental in the creation of several NH regiments, including the 3rd, home of the Nevers’ Band, still active today.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Home Site of Nathaniel Berry Governor 1861-1863 Hebron

“Home Site of Nathaniel Berry Governor, 1861-1863”

“Hebron”

Found on Town Common in Hebron, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Incorporated 1792 from lands of Cockermouth and Plymouth James Goold from Hollis, first settler 1771. 18 Revolutionary War soldiers are buried here. Church is on site of meeting house built in 1800, burned 1945. Library-School House built 1839 as Hebron Academy. Home of Nathaniel S. Berry Governor of New Hampshire 1861-1863.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Hebron

“Hebron”

“Molly Stark House”

Found on State Route 13 in Dunbarton, New Hampshire

Inscription: “Built by her father, Capt. Caleb Page, c. 1759, this was Molly Page’s home in her youth and the wife of Gen. John Stark. Their first son, Caleb, who served with his illustrious father during the Revolution, was born here, as was Molly’s brother, Jeremiah Page, later a Superior Court Justice and delegate to the first Constitutional Convention (1778). This structure also housed the first Dunbarton Post Office (1834).”

Picture of NH Road Marker Molly Stark House Dunbarton

Picture of Molly Stark House in Dunbarton New Hampshire

Molly Stark House in Dunbarton, New Hampshire

“Matthew Thornton (1714-1803)”

Found on State Route 3 in Merrimack, New Hampshire

Inscription: “One of three New Hampshiremen to sign the Declaration of Independence, Matthew Thornton, physician, soldier, patriot, agitated against the Stamp Act of 1765, presided over the Provincial Congress in 1775, served in the State Senate and as an associate justice honors his memory. He is buried in the adjacent cemetery  His homestead stands directly across the highway.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Matthew Thornton Merrimack

“Matthew Thornton”

Picture of Matthew Thornton Memorial in Merrimack, New Hampshire

Matthew Thornton Memorial in Merrimack, New Hampshire

Picture of Matthew Thornton Homestead in Merrimack, New Hampshire

Matthew Thornton Homestead in Merrimack, New Hampshire

Picture of Matthew Thornton Gravesite in Merrimack, New Hampshire

Matthew Thornton Gravesite in Merrimack, New Hampshire

“Frank R. Dean Memorial”

Found on State Route 116 in Haverhill, New Hampshire

Inscription: “1940 Erected in Memory of Frank R. Dean and his wife Lizzie N. Dean friends of this community whose names will ever live by all who knew them, who by their generous gift of $5,000 has made it possible to complete this water system.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Frank R. Dean Memorial Haverhill

“Frank R. Dean Memorial”

“Frankenstein Trestle”

Inscription: “The high steel trestle above was built in 1893 to replace a wrought iron trestle of 1875, and was strengthened in 1930 and 1950. Named for American artist Godfrey N. Frankenstein (1820 – 1873), the adjacent cliff and gulf were formidable barriers to completion of the Portland and Ogdensburg Railroad, later the Maine Central, which connected Portland, ME, and the Great Lakes. Trains used the trestle until 1983. It now carries excursion trains through Crawford Notch.”

Picture of NH Road Marker Frankenstein Trestle

Frankenstein Trestle Historical Road Marker in Crawford Notch, New Hampshire

Picture of Frankenstein Trestle Obscured by Trees

Frankenstein Trestle Obscured by Trees

“Zealand and James Everell Henry”

Inscription: “The village of Zealand grew up in 1875 to serve the logging industry. Henry owned 10,000 acres in the heart of the White Mtns., with a 10-mile railroad to move logs from forest to sawmill. The village had a post office, school, store, housing, and charcoal kilns to eke out every bit of forest value. Depending on the season, the logging business employed 80-250 men. By 1885, Henry left the Valley moving on to Lincoln, leaving the area mostly clear cut. From 1886-1903, fires destroyed the valley and village.”

"Zealand and James Everell Henry" Roadmarker in Carroll, New Hampshire

“Zealand and James Everell Henry” Roadmarker in Carroll, New Hampshire

“Can You Imagine Life in Zealand?”

“In its prime, Zealand was a booming and bustling logging town, with approximately 300 residents from various backgrounds including Canadian, Irish, Polish, Russian and Italian.”

“Along with milled products, charcoal was vital to the local economy. According tot he 1880 Industrial Census, $75,000 worth of charcoal was produced in Zealand Kilns that year.”

“Zealand was more than a logging camp. Though dominated by the large water-powered sawmill, it was a community with a dozen homes, school, general store, post office, boarding house and two railroad stations.”

Zealand Valley 1880-1897

Zealand Valley 1880-1897

See our full list of Historic Road Markers in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

Please add your thoughtful comment . . .